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Barbie Fetish - Dolls

Over the years, the blonde doll of the Mattel house has been invented and reinvented several times, but a few years ago she stopped the glossy smile and scandalized the right-thinking.

The version under review is Barbie Black Canary, a late 1940s comic book heroine who inspired the blonde toy in both name and look.


So far nothing strange, except that the superwoman of the cartoon is characterized by a very aggressive and provocative clothing, and so is the new Barbie, who sports fishnet stockings, very tight body in black leatherette (or is it latex?) , biker-style jacket and gloves - also black - and boots with heels.

For some she is definitely too much: she only lacks a whip, collar and handcuffs, and then she would be a perfect icon of BDSM, that is the complex of erotic and sexual practices based on relationships of domination and submission made substantially of consensual sadomasochism.


So, according to the right-thinking, Black Canary Barbie is perverted, evokes sick relationships and is absolutely not suitable for girls' games.

In short, what Mattel has created is considered a fetish jewel for adults, even if, compared to other more classic versions that see Barbie show off her impossible curves covered only in a bikini, Canary appears more chaste.


And she is more so than the Catwoman model, which also includes the infamous whip.

We are not sure whether or not these types of original Mattel dolls influenced the American artists who started the BDSM versions of the doll, but they certainly introduced a new, unedited and fascinating way of imagining this doll. After all, it was only a matter of time, since almost all BDSMers - especially those who appreciate bondage - usually remember having staged games with their own toys based on ropes, chains, domination or other BDSM expressions. . It is therefore not surprising that some artists have introduced BDSM into the all-vanilla world of the ultra-blonde doll, photographing it in very explicit and more or less vulgar situations. Nor is it surprising that all this has caused a scandal, and that the manufacturer has filed legal action against the artists who have made an "alternative" use of their doll.


What is surprising is the result of these lawsuits: the courts have guaranteed the freedom of the artists to "pervert" the world of the famous doll!

In November 2002, Mattel was defeated twice in as many courts. At first, District Judge Laura Taylor Swain 'denied the firm to prosecute an English craftswoman. Susanne Pitt, a German artist living in England, had put on her website www.dungeondolls.com modified Barbies dressed in fetish and BDSM clothes and accessories. She "only reveals the sexual nature of Barbies by placing her in a modern erotic context," she told the judge. The court ruled that "the references to the accused's artistic expression and parody and the documentary evidence that she has provided of her justify her defense of correct use". Considering that "there are no elements that lead to consider the Dungeon Dolls as replacement products for Barbie." For this reason Susanne Pitt's BDSM Barbie dolls are considered parodies and artistic products and do not infringe Mattel's copyright.


The judge, referring to the presentation of the Dungeon Dolls which described her wearing: "Bavarian-style leather bondage shorts and rubber hood with PVC mask" established that the Barbie Sadomaso was "quite different from the classic product for children produced. from Mattel. " And also that "as far as this court is aware, there is no Barbie S / M line produced by Mattel."

This was not enough, yet in November 2002 another legal action by Mattel, this time against the American photographer Tom Forsythe, was dismissed by the federal judge, who considered the freedom of expression of the artist pre-eminent over Mattel's image right. , which the lawyers of the company alleged had been infringed by the representation of the doll in explicitly sexual situations.


But the real question I ask you is: when you played with a Barbie as a child, in your head did you not play (or even put into practice) some strange "games" with your dolls and sometimes you did not dress them in an ambiguous way? ! ;-)








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